Boosters
  • Oct 30th

    2014

    Author By Administrator

    Gala and Silent Auction Support Educational Theater

    promo 6Our 6th annual Gala and Silent Auction will continue to support student opportunities in educational theater through scholarships, workshop opportunities, specialized staff and ongoing programs like the International Thespian Society and the Spotlight Musical Theatre Program.

    This year’s event will not only have performances by local recording artist Verskotzi and food catered from Green Mill, Walt Disney Studios will be on hand to help promote the upcoming movie of Into the Woods, opening on Christmas Day. The silent auction will be the best yet with original works of art, sports memorabilia, local restaurants and businesses as well as priceless pieces from our shows.

    The gala costs only $10.00 and all proceeds will go to support East Ridge Theater’s education programs. The event begins at 6:00pm on November 7th prior to our 7:30pm opening night performance of Into the Woods.

  • Oct 2nd

    2014

    Author By Administrator

    Volunteer Requirements

    All adults who will be volunteering to work directly with students are required to have a background check performed through District #833. Please complete the Volunteer Background Check form and  return it to Amanda Hestwood at ERHS.

  • May 30th

    2014

    Author By Cindy

    Volunteer Corner: The Loft Stage’s Outstanding Volunteers of 2013-2014

    For years now, former booster board member MARY KEIFFER has been a familiar face at Loft functions.  Always willing to take a lead role on many, many projects, this year’s Outstanding Volunteer dependably follows through with an attention to detail that ensures consistency and quality in all of her efforts.  This year Mary headed up the Fall Gala and Silent Auction, and in her capable hands, the Loft Stage’s biggest fundraiser of the year was a huge success.  And Mary has been tireless, volunteering for ticket sales, poster plaster, special events, etc., etc., the list goes on.  Lucky for the Loft Stage, Mary plans to continue volunteering next year, once again leading the monumental Gala planning efforts.

    When it comes to Loft Stage events, DEB and CHUCK ECKBERG are everywhere.  Because this dynamic duo volunteers A LOT and often together, the Eckbergs were selected jointly as a Loft Stage Outstanding Volunteer.  Of course, they contribute tremendously as individuals:  Chuck secured a large number of donations for the Fall Silent Auction, for example, and Deb organized the potluck dinner for AIDA strike.  But let’s be real, together these two are a force of nature.  The Loft asks, and BAM!  The Eckbergs deliver.  The Loft is giddy to learn they will be sticking around next year.

    Last but not least, go-to guys DAVE WINSTON and TODD NELSON are George’s and Jimmy’s picks as outstanding production volunteers.  Given their impressive work ethics, it comes as no surprise these two volunteers already were featured in a previous newsletter way back in January.  Their Q & A is reprinted below in its entirety:

    ERHS parents Dave Winston and Todd Nelson graciously submitted to a Newsletter interview.  Learn what these Loft Stage supervolunteers have been up to this year, and then ask yourself:  When do these guys sleep?

    Rumor has it you are workshopaholics.  About how many volunteer hours do you put in each week?

    DW–The amount of time varies by show and my work/travel schedule.  During the late summer (prepping the shop and the parade float) and Aida in the fall it was as much as 7-10 hours a week or even more.

    TN–Probably 10, when things are really moving in the scene shop, between Saturdays and a couple of nights a week.

    Wow, you’re putting up some big numbers.  What projects have you been working on this year?  

    DW–I seemed to have worked on a number of pyramids for Aida.  I know the song in the show recommended putting “5000 slaves on standby” but we managed to succeed with a handful of volunteers!

    TN–I helped build pyramids and staircases for Aida, flats for the One-Act, Failure: A Love Story, and did some odd jobs on both.  Plus, moving things.  If nothing else is going on, there’s always something to move into, out of or within the shop.

    And that’s not all you do.  Show biz people often hear: “Don’t quit your day job,” advice that’s equally relevant for avid volunteers such as yourselves.  So, what is your day job?

    DW–I am a Vice President of Underwriting for Arch Insurance Company.  We insure many large construction firms, projects and as well as numerous Fortune 500 companies.  I work a lot with attorneys and actuaries during the day, so it is fun to spend time in the shop and work on something tangible.

    TN–I’m a freelance journalist and specialize in writing about business topics.  Projects include writing a weekly Star Tribune column on small businesses and entrepreneurs.  Most of my work is from home, so I look forward to the interaction and energy in the scene shop.

    Impressive jobs—in terms of both career status and total lack of application to set construction.  But let’s talk guts and glory:  Describe your biggest shop mishap or your greatest construction accomplishment.

    DW–It is difficult to choose one!  I thought that the amount and variety of pieces that we worked on last year for White Christmas was a great accomplishment by the whole team.  As far as mishaps are concerned, my graceful tumble off the shelves in the prop storage room was tough to beat!  Glad the spiral stairs were there to catch me!

    TN–I enjoyed seeing how the separate pieces we had worked on for Aida came together as a whole and how the cast, crew and orchestra brought so much life to it all on stage.  More than made up for the occasional splinter.  

    At last, you’ve come to the multiple-choice portion of your interview.  Select from the lettered options to complete the following sentence:  The reason I volunteer at the Loft Stage is…

    A.  It’s a great way to give back and support my child’s interest in theater.
    B.  It satisfies man’s powerful subconscious drive to create.
    C.  One word:  George.
    D.  Two words:  Power Tools.
    E.  Any excuse to wear those attractive safety goggles.
    F.  Finally, an opportunity to use high school math to solve real world problems.

    DW–All of the above.  Plus I have a whole new audience for awful puns.

    TN–All!  And it’s often is a welcome refuge from our menagerie of cats, dogs and other pets.

    Gentlemen, thanks so much for your time and talents.  On behalf of the Loft Stage, The Newsletter salutes you.

  • Apr 30th

    2014

    Author By Cindy

    Q and A with Marcie Berglund

     

     

    The Multi-talented

    MARCIE BERGLUND

    answers a few probing questions

    (and sums herself up in a haiku!)

     Q:  What was the very first theater production you remember seeing?

    A:  It was in Frankfurt, Germany (I am an army brat) and my mother was involved in the base community theater.  It was Menotti’s  “Amahl and the Night Visitors.”  That was in 1965.  I went on to play a kid in the next production of “Brigadoon.”

    Q:  Briefly describe the directorial highs and lows you’ve encountered helming The Glass Slipper.

    A:   Most of the directing experiences have been highs for “the Glass Slipper:”  I have loved staging it using Commedia as our inspirational acting tool. Seeing the cast get comfortable with going “overboard” with their movement and characters is always rewarding.  I love working with the staff on the vision and implementation.  Lows?  Conflicts of actors.

    Q:  What has it been like to take on the WHS musical?

    A:   I loved every minute of doing the musical at WHS.  Knowing it may be a hard transition for the students just made it more of a challenge for me to make sure the students were comfortable without changing my ways as a director or lowering my expectations of them. They are a wonderful group of kids and I can’t wait to work with them again!

    Q:  If you could cast yourself in any show on any stage, what role would you play, and where would you play it?

    A:  So many roles, so little time left!  Some I’d like to play:  Mama Rose in “Gypsy,”  Norma Desmond in “Sunset Boulevard,” Joann in “Company,”  Countess Charlotte Malcolm in “A Little NIght Music” ( I have played the last two but would do it again in a heartbeat), and Dolly Levi in “Hello Dolly.”  I would love to work at the Bloomington Civic Theater again.  Love working at Theater in the Round, too.  And of course the Loftstage!!

    Q:   In modern or traditional Haiku, please answer the following question:  Who is Marcie Berglund?

    A:

    Playing’s the thing

    Characters

    Create love

     

    Q:  What’s your motto?

    A:  “Life is a banquet.. and most people are starving to death.”

    Q:  Multiple Choice: Choose one of the following to play you in a movie:

      A.  Meryl Streep

    B.  Miley Cyrus

    C.  She-Ra, Princess of Power

    D.  LOL cat

     E.  This kid

    A:   This kid.. cause I am really very immature for my age and the kid looks like she could be funny.

    Thank you, Marcie!

  • Apr 29th

    2014

    Author By Administrator

    The Loft Stage Theater Banquet

    Students who wish to register late should see Ms. Hestwood as soon as possible.

    The evening will begin with dinner in the cafeteria at 6:00pm and conclude with the award ceremony in the theater at 7:00pm on May 28th. The cost is $10.00 and all student participants and their families are invited to attend. Registration is due by May 19th. Join us for a wonderful evening to celebrate the students, parents and staff of The Loft Stage!


  • Jan 31st

    2014

    Author By Cindy

    Volunteers in the Spotlight: Dave Winston and Todd Nelson

     

    DAVE WINSTON                                        TODD NELSON

    ERHS parents Dave Winston and Todd Nelson graciously submitted to a Newsletter interview.  Learn what these Loft Stage supervolunteers have been up to this year, and then ask yourself:  When do these guys sleep?

    Rumor has it you are workshopaholics.  About how many volunteer hours do you put in each week?

    • D.W.  The amount of time varies by show and my work/travel schedule.  During the late summer (prepping the shop and the parade float) and Aida in the fall it was as much as 7-10 hours a week or even more.
    • T.N.  Probably 10, when things are really moving in the scene shop, between Saturdays and a couple of nights a week.

     

    Wow, you’re putting up some big numbers.  What projects have you been working on this year?  

    • D.W.  I seemed to have worked on a number of pyramids for Aida.  I know the song in the show recommended putting “5000 slaves on standby” but we managed to succeed with a handful of volunteers!
    • T.N.  I helped build pyramids and staircases for Aida, flats for the One-Act, Failure: A Love Story, and did some odd jobs on both.  Plus, moving things.  If nothing else is going on, there’s always something to move into, out of or within the shop.

     

    And that’s not all you do.  Show biz people often hear: “Don’t quit your day job,” advice that’s equally relevant for avid volunteers such as yourselves.  So, what is your day job?

    • D.W. I am a Vice President of Underwriting for Arch Insurance Company.  We insure many large construction firms, projects and as well as numerous Fortune 500 companies.  I work a lot with attorneys and actuaries during the day, so it is fun to spend time in the shop and work on something tangible.
    • T.N.  I’m a freelance journalist and specialize in writing about business topics.  Projects include writing a weekly Star Tribune column on small businesses and entrepreneurs.  Most of my work is from home, so I look forward to the interaction and energy in the scene shop.

     

    Impressive jobs—in terms of both career status and total lack of application to set construction.  But let’s talk guts and glory:  Describe your biggest shop mishap or your greatest construction accomplishment.

    • D.W. It is difficult to choose one!  I thought that the amount and variety of pieces that we worked on last year for White Christmas was a great accomplishment by the whole team.  As far as mishaps are concerned, my graceful tumble off the shelves in the prop storage room was tough to beat!  Glad the spiral stairs were there to catch me!
    • T.N.  I enjoyed seeing how the separate pieces we had worked on for Aida came together as a whole and how the cast, crew and orchestra brought so much life to it all on stage.  More than made up for the occasional splinter.  

    At last, you’ve come to the multiple-choice portion of your interview.  Select from the lettered options to complete the following sentence:  The reason I volunteer at the Loft Stage is…

    A.  It’s a great way to give back and support my child’s interest in theater.
    B.  It satisfies man’s powerful subconscious drive to create.
    C.  One word:  George.
    D.  Two words:  Power Tools.
    E.  Any excuse to wear those attractive safety goggles.
    F.  Finally, an opportunity to use high school math to solve real world problems.

    • D.W.  All of the above.  Plus I have a whole new audience for awful puns.
    • T.N.  All!  And it’s often is a welcome refuge from our menagerie of cats, dogs and other pets.

     

    Gentlemen, thanks so much for your time and talents.  On behalf of the Loft Stage, The Newsletter salutes you.

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